Chicago Style Italian Beef

Today we’re examining Chicago Style Italian Beef including the history, the ingredients and most importantly where to get it. In the past we’ve broken down Chicago Deep Dish Pizza and it is probably more involved than you might think.

Chicago Style Italian Beef History

We’re not sure why we Chicagoans have such a hard time with history and getting stories straight. Who started the Great Chicago Fire of 1871? Where did we get our Chicago Nicknames? Italian Beef also has some debatable origins. Here are a handful of the most recognized theories.

  1. 1925 a company by the name of Scala’s Original Beef and Sausage Company started in Chicago. (Spoiler alert: it still does operate and supplies many Chicago restaurants with their meat for beef sandwiches). According to them the Italian Beef was introduced at weddings and banquets. The roasted beef was sliced thing and served on bread to help “stretch” the food to feed the many guests. It was, needless to say, a very popular item and the rest is history.
  2. Then there is the story of an Italian immigrant working in the Chicago Stock Yards in the early 1900s. (The stock yards were Chicago’s meat-packing district, and Chicago led the world in meat packing back then). The worker would take home the less desirable cuts of meat that the company sold and according to the story made literally the same exact thing that is served today: roast the beef in Italian spices and broth, slice it, serve on Italian bread. This one seems a bit far-fetched, but we love it.
  3. And while perhaps not the inventory of Italian Beef sandwiches we do have to tip our caps to Al Ferreri and his sister and brother-in-law, Frances and Chris Pacelli. Why? Because that trio is responsible for opening Al’s Beef in 1938. The restaurant is still open today and has expanded quite a bit. In fact there is one in Dubai now!

Regardless of who invented the Chicago Style Italian Beef when we know this much – it’s dang good. Let’s take a closer look at the ingredients used to make these sandwiches.

Chicago Style Italian Beef Ingredients

Al’s Beef Chicago Style Italian Sausage. Don’t you tell us this doesn’t make you hungry.

We like this part the best. So often we don’t know what were eating. A Chicago Style Italian Beef? Easy, it’s meat, bread, juice and maybe some peppers, right? Not so fast…

The meat used to make an Italian Beef sandwich is beef. Typically it’s one of three different cuts of meat: sirloin rear, bottom round or top round. Bottom Round is by far the most popular which if you look at the graphic below it would be a 32 lb. cut of beef just above the shank on the outside of the steer’s hind legs.

Study and remember these cuts the next time you are shopping for beef in the grocery store.                                                                                                                        Source: Yzmo at the English language Wikipedia [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)

Most likely the cut used in Italian Beef is going to be from the Bottom Round because it’s lean and it’s the cheapest cut. However the meat isn’t as tender as some of the other cuts. To make the meat soft and delicious it’s roasted at a medium heat in a garlicky broth infused with Italian spices such as oregano. This style of roasting in a liquid is called a wet roast. Depending on the exact style of cut and how long the beef is roasted you could lose almost half of the weight during the cooking process. Yikes!

Once the beef is cooked it’s then sliced thin in a deli slicer and returned to it’s broth to cook some more before being served to you on an Italian roll with your choice of peppers – either sweet or hot.

You’re going to get your choice – sweet or hot peppers. Of course you could opt for neither, but if you take one or the other here is what you’re getting:

  • Sweet Peppers – the pepper is actually called the Friggitello, but you might here it in the streets called “Golden Greek”. We (Americans) will often times confuse this with a peperoncini – THIS IS NOT a peperoncini. Oh, and often times if you order sweet peppers on your Italian Beef you could get simply cooked green bell peppers, which is OK too.
  • Hot Peppers – Mmm. This is where it’s at! When you order hot peppers on your Chicago Style Italian Beef you aren’t simply going to get a couple of whole peppers thrown on there. You’re going to get a hot relish of pickled vegetables that INCLUDE peppers called Giardiniera. (Pronounced: JAR – DIH – NAIR – AH) This HOT style relish is a Chicago thing and we’ll often times add sport peppers to kick it up a notch. The remaining vegetables include carrots, celery, cauliflower, serrano peppers and gherkins. There can be an entire post on Giardiniera – which is a good idea…

Some places you can have them throw cheese on top, typically melted mozzarella. We’ve had it. It’s not bad – actually it’s quite good. However, there is just something that feels “right” about not getting cheese. No one is going to look at you crazy if you order a cheesy beef though.

And when you order you are definitely going to be asked “Wet or Dry?” This can throw a first-timer off. You might be wondering, “wait…what? it’s a sandwich..” Here is what you need to know to properly answer:

  • Wet: The beef gets pulled from the broth with tongs and is immediately put onto the Italian roll – most of the juices are soaked into the bread.
  • Dry: The beef gets pulled from the broth and the server gives the beef a chance to dry off. Most of the juices drip back into the pot and don’t make it to your bread.
  • Dipped: This is a thing. Beef sandwich is made and then with the tongs the ENTIRE sandwich is dipped into the broth. 100 out 100 in the flavor department, 100 out of 100 in the very soggy, kind of hard to eat department too.

Where to get Chicago Style Italian Beef

Johnnie’s Beef (Courtesy of TripAdvisor)

There are so many great places for Italian Beef in Chicago. We couldn’t possibly list them all. We’ll do our best to provide our favorites. If we forgot a place on this list add it to the comments section. In no particular order…

Al’s Beef – Many locations, one of the originals founded in 1938

Mr. Beef on Orleans – Another one of the originals – classic.

Johnnie’s Beef – One of our favorites – located just west of Chicago. Yum.

Portillo’s – A Chicagoland favorite – has a large menu of other foods too and many locations across the city.

Jay’s Beef – This place serves awesome beef sandwiches and is located in Wicker Park. So we like it. A lot.

Enjoy your Chicago Style Italian Beef sandwiches!

Chicago Neighborhood Guide: Lincoln Park

Lincoln Park really does have it all. Plenty of unique boutique shops, restaurants galore, a thriving nightlife, miles of park along Lake Michigan, North Ave Beach, Lincoln Park Zoo, a Nature Museum and more. It’s why we offer a Free 2 hour Guided Tour of Lincoln Park.

The easy part is deciding to visit Lincoln Park. The hard part is deciding on how long to stay and what exactly you should do. Let’s assume you have 1 full day to spend in Lincoln Park, here is what you should do.

Breakfast or Brunch?

breakfastLP

Orange Contemporary Brunch

First things first you’re going to need to get come food in your belly because you have a big day planned. If you’re visiting on a weekday we suggest stopping Orange Contemporary Brunch (2413 N Clark St) which is open everyday of the week at 8am. Make sure to try their orange peel coffee and a pancake flight. If you’re visiting on the weekends and want to try a special menu for brunch stop by Cafe Ba-Ba-Reeba (2024 N Halsted St) which serves a Spanish-inspired sweet and savory brunch menu starting at 9am on Saturday and Sunday. Our favorite is the Breakfast Paella which serves 2-3 people.

Get your shop on.

Regardless of where you fill up to start the day you’re next stop is going to be the Chicago Landmark Armitage-Halsted District. This is the center of the main shopping corridor in Lincoln Park. If you find yourself on Clark Street for breakfast make sure to stop in Aaron’s Apothecary (2338 N Clark St) and check out their fantastic selection of high-end candles & skin care. Estheticians are waiting to help you with any questions and make sure you leave with the right product.

Once you’re at the intersection of Armitage & Halsted you’re just a short walk to many of our favorite shops. Just west on Armitage is a great little stationary and gift shop – All She Wrote (825 W Armitage Ave). Just north on Halsted is a very unique place specializing in one-of-a-kind fragrances. Aroma Workshop (2050 N. Halstead Street) offers their guests an opportunity to create their very own fragrance with workshops and classes. Check their schedule and make an appointment or walk-in and see how it works. Continuing up Halsted you will not only be walking along one of Chicago’s most beautiful retail streets but you will come across a wide variety of shops as well. Groshek Art Gallery (2136 N Halsted St), Read It & Eat (2142 N Halsted St), & Calvin Tran (2154 N Halsted St) all line the west side of the street.

But don’t just take our word for it, explore the area on foot and pop into all the wonderful shops that line the streets. Soon you will have worked up a hunger and if you’re still in the Armitage-Halsted District then you’re going to have lots of options.

Lunch in Lincoln Park

Butcher & The Burger

Butcher & The Burger

Let’s assume that you’re still in the vicinity, here are the best walkable options.

Cheaper/Fast Eats

Affordable Sit Down

  • Pasta Palazzo – Handmade pastas and tasty sangria – need we say more?
  • Athenian Room – Greek sit down with a patio and BYOB policy.

Mid-Range

  • Summer House Santa Monica – This LEYE takes you to California ..in Lincoln Park.
  • Chez Moi – Serving French classics in a casual atmosphere with outdoor seating.

Mid Afternoon in Lincoln Park

Are you full? We hope so. Time work off some of those calories you ate and probably drank. And luckily there is just the activity to do that. Free Chicago Walking Tours has a Lincoln Park tour at 2pm that will start near the intersection of Armitage & Halsted. This is the perfect way to really see Lincoln Park.

Your guide will share with you the history of Chicago & Lincoln Park while winding your way way east through one of the most beautiful residential neighborhoods in Chicago and concluding the tour with a stroll through the Alfred Caldwell Lilly Pool and leaving you just steps from the Lincoln Park Conservatory & Lincoln Park Zoo – both free!

From there you will not want to miss grabbing a drink, and maybe an appetizer, at one of Chicago’s best rooftop bars – The J. Parker. Opening their doors at 5pm during the week and 11:30am on the weekends this place is a DO NOT MISS when the sky is clear. Enjoy amazing views of Lincoln Park and the Chicago skyline from the north – a perspective you do not get with rooftops in the Loop and River North.

After a couple of drinks it’s time to head back to your hotel and get ready for the night. There is still a lot of left to do.

Dinner

Pizza

  • Pequods – Our favorite deep dish pizza. If you haven’t had deep dish and you want to then go here. Please.
  • Chicago Pizza & Oven Grinder Co – Unique potpie-style pizzas served upside down. Always a wait so you know it’s good.

Lincoln Park Specialties

  • Twin Anchors – The best ribs in Chicago. No reservations, expect to wait.
  • The Barrelhouse Flat – Arguable the best bar in Lincoln Park with a small dinner menu. Make sure you visit their upstairs.
  • Social Table – Learn how to cook and meet others at this communal dining spot in Lincoln Park.

Our Favorites for Special Occassion

  • Riccardo Trattoria – delicious regional Italian cuisine in an intimate setting.
  • Intro – the hottest chef’s rotate every 3 months making sure your dinners are never the same.
  • North Pond – Michelin-starred with romantic setting overlooking the Chicago skyline.

And finally, after your dinner it’s time for dancing. And there is no single place we’d rather get our groove on than the world famous blues club Kingston Mines (2548 N Halsted St). This place opens at 7pm every single day (and has for 40+ year) and goes until 4am. Cover to get in is $12 during the week and $15 on the weekend – but is well worth the price. The music is unbelievable. The musicians are the most talented blues musicians in the city. We absolutely love this place.

 

Chicago Pizza

Pizza. Arguably America’s favorite food. There is a really funny quote about pizza that says when pizza is good, it’s great – but when its bad it’s still pretty darn good. In a 2015 survey by gluten-free crust purveyor Smart Flour Foods and the Center for Generational Kinetics, more than 6 million adults said they would give up sex for a year before they’d stop eating pizza. Hahah – wow.

Pizza History

Pizza gained popularity in the late 1940s after US troops stationed in Italy brought the concept back to the States. Over the last 70+ years pizza has taken on many different looks and feels courtesy of different regions of the USA creating their version of the pizza. Today the pizza industry in the United States is an estimated $37B – yes, that is a B, as in Billions.

Regardless of where you are eating your pizza there are some general differences between American pizza and traditional Italian pizza. The most notable difference is the ingredients use to make the dough. In the US we use fat in our dough – typically a vegetable oil or shortening (in some cases olive oil). The amount of oil or shortening will vary depending on the style of pizza. For instance a New York Style pizza will use a very little amount of oil while a thick-crust Chicago Deep Dish pizza will use quite a bit. Another difference is the actual flour that we use here. Often times the dough will have a high gluten level – think of a dough that would be used to make a bagel. The high gluten percentage allows the pizza dough to be stretched to the max creating an uber thin crust.

Chicago Style Pizza

Giordano's

Giordano’s

Believe it or not Chicago has 3 distinct styles of pizza. Chicago Deep Dish is by far the most popular. You’ve probably had the other two and may not have known you were even eating a Chicago-style pizza. The other two styles are Chicago Stuffed and Chicago Thin Crust.

Chicago Deep Dish has a bit of a controversial beginning in that no one really knows for certain who or where the pizza came from – for certain. The most common theory is that Pizzeria Uno in 1943 invented the pizza. Whether or not that is in fact the truth is not important – the stuff is good regardless.

Kind of exactly how the name sounds the biggest difference with the Chicago Deep Dish pizza is the depth of the crust. The pizza is baked in a high-wall steel pan, similar to how you would bake a cake. The crust itself isn’t very thick but there is a “wall” of crust along the outer edge. The pan is almost always lined with an oil that gives the bottom and side crusts a “fried” effect making it crispy. It’s common to order your pizza “well done” or “extra crispy” when getting deep dish.

The layering of the remaining ingredients is a bit unique as well. Often times the first layer to be put onto of the bottom crust is the cheese – most common is mozzarella. The next set of ingredients are the toppings that you have ordered and finally the sauce is poured over as the last layer.

For those ordering to-go or delivery you might end up with an uncut pie. Don’t worry though, this was intentional. The pizza is specifically left uncut to prevent the juices from seeping into the crust and creating a soggy pizza. You don’t want that.

Chicago Stuffed Pizza is the deep dish pizza’s stunt double. It’s very easy to mistake the stuffed pizza for the deep dish pizza.

These pizzas were invented in the 1970’s by a couple of pizza chains that began tweaking their recipes and styles of the deep dish pizza. Inspired by a traditional Italian Easter pie the pizza chefs created the Chicago Stuffed pizza.

The easiest way to think about the difference is this:

  1. The ingredient layer is more dense than traditional deep dish pizza
  2. On top of the tomato sauce (which is the last layer of deep dish pizza) is another layer of dough that is pressed (or connected to) the side crust. Creating a sort of pie. And just like pies the cooks will poke holes in the top layer of dough to allow the pizza to steam and prevent an unfortunately explosion in the kitchen!

You would think that would be really easy to identify, right? The stuffed pizza has a top layer of dough, the deep dish pizza has a top layer of sauce. Not so fast. More times than not pizza sauce is ladled over the top layer of crust and making it nearly impossible for the amateur to tell the difference.

Chicago Thin Crust doesn’t get the attention of the deep dish or stuffed pizza, but please – do not overlook this version. As the name implies the crust on this pizza is quite thin but is strong. And by strong we mean that it can hold quite the amount of topping without “bending” and there is a crunch when you bite into the pizza. This is much different than the popular New York style pizza which has flimsy dough and it curled in your hand and eaten like a taco. The cut of the pizza – in squares – is a also a giveaway you’re eating Chicago Thin Crust and not a version of New York which is served in large triangles.

Where to eat Chicago Pizza?

This is the hardest part, trying to help someone figure out where to eat their pizza. Fortunately you really can’t go wrong no matter where you go. If you can eat at all the places then by all means do so!

Lou Malnati’s (deep dish)

Pequod’s Pizzeria (deep dish)

Gino’s East (deep dish)

Pizzeria Uno (deep dish)

Giordano’s (stuffed)

Rosati’s (thin crust)

Pizano’s Pizza (thin crust)

The Art of Pizza (deep dish)

What places did we miss that should be included on this list?

Chicago Neighborhood Guide: Andersonville

Getting to Andersonville

Andersonville is one of Chicago’s great neighborhoods.  Located on Chicago’s far north side, it is easily accessible by public transportation.  Using the city’s “L” train, take the Red Line to the Berwyn stop or the Bryn Mawr stop.  From either stop, it’s just a 10-minute walk west to downtown Andersonville.   You can also catch the #22 city bus, disembarking at any of the stops along Clark Street, between Foster Avenue, which borders Andersonville on its south end, and Edgewater Avenue, which borders Andersonville to the north.

If the weather cooperates, you can get around by bicycle.  Consider taking advantage of Divvy, Chicago’s bike share system.  There’s a station conveniently located at the intersection of Clark St. and Bryn Mawr Ave.  But don’t worry—When the weather isn’t bike-friendly, cabs are always plentiful.

Andersonville History

Andersonville dates back to the 1850s, when it was settled by Swedish immigrants.  There are still plenty of signs of Andersonville’s Swedish heritage.  Andersonville celebrates its Swedish roots with Midsommarfest, an annual summer street festival.  The south end of Andersonville is anchored by The Swedish American Museum and features several businesses with Swedish roots, like Svea Restaurant and The Swedish Bakery.  The Swedish Bakery makes some of the best pastries in the city, including an assortment of Swedish pastries.  Be warned that The Swedish Bakery is closed on Sundays!

Andersonville is home to one of the largest LGBT populations in Chicago.  It boasts several gay bars, including @mosphere, The Call, and Mary’s Attic.

Andersonville in 1 Day

If you only have one day to spend in Andersonville, consider these suggestions, all of which are located along Clark Street, Andersonville’s main drag.

Start your day on the north end of Andersonville, with breakfast at m. henry (5707 N. Clark St.).  This breakfast, lunch, and brunch spot is insanely popular.  If you want to enjoy a classic weekend brunch, arrive very early or face a 90-minute wait.

After breakfast, enjoy Andersonville’s shopping scene, which is refreshingly void of any big chain stores.  Just north of m. henry, you’ll find Gethsemane Garden Center (5739 N. Clark St.). Even if you’re not into gardening, you’ll enjoy its Wild Pansy Gift Shop.

andersonvilleshopping

Moving southwards on Clark Street, you’ll find a dizzying array of independently-owned home furnishings and antique shops, like Roost (5634 N. Clark St.) and Room Service (5438 N. Clark St.).  You’ll also find fabulous gourmet food and wine shops, like City Olive (5644 N. Clark St.) and In Fine Spirits (5418 N. Clark St.).  Fans of Italian food will enjoy Piatto Pronto (5624 N. Clark St), a grocery and deli carrying Italian imports and the biggest, most delicious, and best-priced deli sandwiches in the city.

If you’re in the mood for a sit-down lunch, stop by Big Jones (5347 N. Clark St.) for U.S. coastal southern cuisine. Start with a Pickle Tasting (a sampling of homemade pickles and home-baked Sally Lunn bread) and an order of fried green tomatoes.  For your main course, enjoy Big Jones’ award-winning fried chicken or an order of shrimp and grits.  Lunch is available Monday-Friday only.  If you come on a weekend, enjoy a Big Jones brunch from 9.am. – 3 p.m.

After lunch, enjoy a mani/pedi at 2×10 Nails (5414 N. Clark St.).  If that’s not your thing, while away the afternoon browsing more of Andersonville’s locally-owned shops.  Vinyl lovers will appreciate Borderline Music (5351 N. Clark St.).  Book lovers will enjoy Women & Children First, an independently-owned bookshop (5233 N. Clark St.) specializing in feminist and children’s books.  This shop is a gem if you’re looking for a gift, but aren’t sure what to buy.  Their sales staff makes excellent suggestions and complimentary gift-wrapping is offered.

No trip to Andersonville would be complete without a trip to Andersonville Galleria (5247 N. Clark St.), a retail building that houses 90+ tenants.  Its tenants are local artists and entrepreneurs, selling everything from jewelry, gourmet treats, unique homemade gifts, and more!

Care for a cocktail before dinner? Stop by Marty’s Martini Bar (1511 W. Balmoral Ave., just one block west of Clark St.) for an expertly-made cocktail.  Warning: Marty’s is small and extremely popular, so arrive early!

Andersonville has an enticing array of restaurant options.  For an upscale dinner that isn’t at all stuffy, choose Anteprima (5316 N. Clark St.).  Anteprima services seasonal Italian cuisine, complemented by a full bar.  The dinner menu features standouts like Arneis Braised Rabbit and Grilled Lamb Leg.  Anteprima emphasizes fresh, seasonal ingredients, so the menu changes often.

Free Chicago Walking Tours Andersonville Food

For a more casual dinner option, choose Jerry’s Sandwiches (5419 N. Clark St.)  Jerry’s Sandwiches features 100+ sandwich options and offers even more craft beer choices, many of which are made right in Chicago.

After dinner, head over to Mary’s Attic (5400 N. Clark St.), which is the 2nd floor of Hamburger Mary’s Restaurant. Mary’s Attic is a bar featuring an ever-changing menu of entertainment options, like live bands and MaryOke (karaoke).  Straight people are welcome at this establishment/gay bar.  Or if you’re in the mood for comedy, check out The pH Comedy Theater (1515 W. Berwyn, one block west of Clark St.).  This comedy theater offers a wide variety of comedy shows…improv, standup, sketch, and musical.  Its shows come “For the Family,” “PG13,” or “Adults Only.”  Check out their website www.whatisph.com for a schedule.

Andersonville…a fabulous neighborhood with something for everyone!

Great Chicago Date Nights that are NOT Dinner and a Movie

We don’t have anything against dinner and a movie. It’s a tried and true date night. But when there is so much more that you could do in a place like Chicago why settle? Whether this is your first trip to Chicago and you’re scoping out the Tinder scene or you have been married for 30 years these date ideas will help you step out of the box and create an unforgettable day.

Second City Chicago

One of our favorites. If you like to laugh – and you think that your partner will too – then this is for you. There are all different kinds of shows at Second City. From improv to standup to productions You will want to check their calendar and book your tickets in advance, especially if you plan on taking in a show on the weekends as this place will sell out.

Bar:  Good news the venue is located in the heart of Old Town that has no shortage of options to grab a before or after show drink(s). We recommend checking out the Old Town  Pour House with one of Chicago’s largest beer selections only a 5 minute walk from the stage.

Adler Planetarium

planetarium

We love this because it will give both of you the chance to walk around (which encourages conversation) and the sights themselves will be the topics of those aforementioned conversations. Plus you will get a chance to lay out on your backs and watch the stars. All this for $12 with their general admission, not bad at all. (Tickets can be much more expensive once you start tacking on shows and what not)

Bar: The Adler Planetarium is located on Chicago’s Museum Campus with it’s neighbors the Shedd Aquarium and Chicago Field Museum. The point we’re trying to make is there aren’t many good bar options within walking distance. If you are a rockstar and plan your date accordingly you could attend Adler After Dark and have your cocktails there. For those of us not as skilled in the craft of extreme planning pop into the Palmer House and visit their Lobby Bar at one of Chicago’s most famous hotels.

Kayaking

It’s probably not the activity that comes to mind when someone says “Chicago” – but when it’s summertime here in the Windy City taking an architectural kayaking tour along the Chicago River will be tough to beat. There are a handful of different tour companies operating in Chicago with slightly different itineraries. You can even rent kayaks and give your date a special one-on-one tour. And if kayaking isn’t quite your thing you can always opt for stand up paddle boards.

Bar: This one is a little tricky since you might be entering or exiting the river at different points. We certainly don’t recommend you pound drinks before getting in a kayak -so please, save these for after. One of our favorite spots that will give you views of the river, skyline and Lake Michigan is the Terrace at Trump Tower. Just be ready, this isn’t the cheapest spot – cocktails will set you back $20+ per. YOLO.

Adult Arcade

If you haven’t heard of these beer-serving, 21-and-older-to-enter, throwback arcades that are popping up in cities across America well then you are welcome. A favorite of ours also happens to be in our of our favorite neighborhoods of all time. Emporium Arcade Bar in Wicker Park.  TMNT – check. NBA Jam – check. Live music – check, although – check their schedule because it’s not every night.  And even better news too – most of the music events are FREE.

Bar: Hmmm. How do we handle this one? Technically Emporium Arcade Bar IS A BAR. If you think that you might need a bit of liquid courage before taking your date on in Mortal Kombat then you’re in luck. Up and down Milwaukee Avenue, Division and North Avenue are dozens and dozens of bars. Good luck making it into the arcade and not just bar hopping in this part of town.

Lincoln Park Zoo and/or Conservatory

Lincoln_park_conservatory

We sort of have you covered both summer and winter with this one. If you come in the summer, great – take a stroll through the park, the zoo and the conservatory. We call that the Trifecta. Here in the colder months? That’s OK too – a stroll through the conservatory is even more impressive this time of the year. Especially if you catch their seasonal decor before it’s taken down the first week of January.  Regardless there will not be a shortage of things to look at and do. You will be impressed with how quickly you escape the hustle and bustle of the city here.

Bar: So many great options here. The Barrelhouse Flat gets high marks for their unique cocktails and romantic setting. You can’t get more cozy than Chicago Pizza & Oven Grinder Company (good luck getting a seat though). And for those interested in a really late night cocktail Ravens is open until 4am on most nights.

Now that you know what date nights we like, what was your best date in Chicago?